Lopsided win for union workers in Las Vegas

In a lopsided vote, 78 percent of the workers at Stations Casino’s Green Valley Ranch in the suburbs of Las Vegas voted to join the Culinary Workers Union Local 226 and the Bartenders Union Local 165, both are affiliates of UNITE HERE.

The large margin of victory is notable, said D. Taylor, president of UNITE HERE, because it flies in the face of conventional wisdom about the status of the labor movement.

The union victory, said Taylor, “proves that the media narrative that labor is dying is untrue, but that working people can win against all odds when they organize together.”

The union win is the third recent victory for pro-union workers at Stations Casino properties in the Las Vegas area.

Taylor also said that the union victory at Green Valley Ranch was notable because it took place in a so-called right-to-work state where the state “rigs the laws against workers to take away their power.”

The roots of the Green Valley Ranch victory can be traced back to 2010 when hundreds Stations Casino workers from all over Las Vegas came together to form a union organizing committee.

Stations Casino is owned by Red Rock Resorts, a publicly traded company controlled by Frank and Lorenzo Fertitta.

The Fertitta brothers took exception with their workers’ desire for a voice on the job and fought the organizing drive every step of the way.

Among other things, they ran television ads in 2012 warning workers not to join the union.

They also hired a union avoidance company, which conducted an ongoing anti-union campaign at work.

But union supporters fought back with their own spirited campaign, and in September 2016 workers at Boulder Station, a hotel and casino located about 11 miles east of the famous Las Vegas Strip, voted to join UNITE HERE by a vote of 355 to 177.

Desperate to stave off further union victories at their properties, the Fertitta brothers announced that they would lower health insurance premiums for all of Stations non-union workers; however union workers, they said, would continue to pay the same higher premiums.

Two months later when another union vote took place at Palace Station, another Station hotel and casino located a few miles away from the Strip, the union narrowly lost by four votes.

UNITE HERE blamed the loss on Stations’ decision to punish its newly unionized Boulder workers with higher health care premiumS and filed charges with National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).

The NLRB ruled that Stations acted illegally by punishing workers for their pro-union vote, and in March reached an agreement with the company requiring it to recognize the union at both its Boulder and Palace properties.

The next union vote at a Stations’ property took place on November 8 and 9 at Green Valley Ranch, a luxury boutique casino resort located in Henderson, Nevada about 16  miles southeast of Las Vegas.

The union won by a vote of 564 to 166.

Workers at Green Valley Ranch said that they voted for the union because they wanted the same wages and union benefits as workers at union hotels and casinos on the Strip and in downtown Las Vegas.

“We voted ‘YES’ to join the Culinary Union because we deserve fair wages and good benefits,” said Gladis Sosa de Funes, a guest room attendant at Green Valley Ranch. “Everyone knows the Culinary Health Plan is the best health insurance in Las Vegas, and we want our families to have it.”

Michael Wagner, a bartender at Green Valley Ranch since 2001, said that the organizing campaign to win a union was long and hard but it was worth it.

“I’m happy to have been able to help organize my coworkers and I felt so proud to vote ‘YES’ for the union!” said Wagner. “I look forward to joining together with other Station Casinos workers in negotiations with the company so we can have a fair union contract soon.”

The win at Green Valley Ranch leaves seven other Stations’ properties in the Las Vegas area that are still non-union: Red Rock Resort, Palms Casino Resort, Santa Fe Station, Sunset Stations, Texas Stations, Fiesta Henderson, and Fiesta Station.

Local 226 has informed the public that there is still a labor dispute at these properties and urges people coming to Las Vegas for a vacation to patronize hotels and casinos listed at fairhotel.org.

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Unions denounce TPS decision/recommendations

Two unions criticized decisions by the US government that threaten to overturn the lives of tens of thousands of immigrant workers who had been granted temporary protected status (TPS).

On Friday, November 3, the US State Department recommended that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) end TPS for immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras and Nicaragua.

On Monday, November 6, DHS ended TPS to 5300 people from Nicaragua and postponed a final decision on the fate of 86,000 Hondurans, leaving them in a kind of legal limbo.

Maria Elena Durazo, general vice president of UNITE HERE, whose membership includes thousands of TPS recipients, many of whom work in the hospitality industry, called DHS’ decision “inhumane.”

Rocio Sáenz, SEIU executive vice president, said that the State Department’s recommendation was a result of “the anti-immigrant animus that has now infected the Trump Administration top to bottom.”

For decades, the US government has granted temporary protected status to people fleeing violence, political repression, or the aftermath of natural disasters in their home countries.

The US has designated 12 countries whose immigrants are eligible for TPS: El Salvador, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Liberia, Nicaragua, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Somalia, Sudan (whose TPS status terminates November 2018), Syria, and Yemen.

Currently there are about 435,000 people living in the US who have been granted TPS.

Granting TPS to immigrants means that they can live and work in the US without fear of deportation, and many TPS immigrants have done so for decades.

The US government regularly determines whether to extend TPS status to each designated country. Until recently, TPS extensions have been routine.

But on November 6, DHS decided to end Nicaragua’s TPS designation and gave Nicaraguan TPS recipients until January 2019 to leave the US.

DHS temporarily extended TPS for people from Honduras to July 2018, but according to Reuters, the agency said their TPS “could then be terminated,” leaving 86,000 people from Honduras with an uncertain future.

UNITE HERE said that DHS’ decision on Nicaragua and Honduras “could have a devastating impact on hundreds of thousands of families and the US economy.”

“TPS recipients, like the thousands that our union represent, are dedicated and longtime employees, many of whom have been at their jobs for decades,” said Durazo.

“Because of the astounding cruelty and foolhardiness of Donald Trump and the Department of Homeland Security, . . . tens of thousands of lives could be ruined with this TPS termination,” continued Durazo, architect of the union’s national immigration campaign. “Ending TPS for Nicaraguan recipients or any others will forcibly tear apart American families, taking TPS recipients who have lived in the US for over twenty years from their American-born children, from their jobs, and from their homes.”

Sáenz said that the State Department’s recommendation to end TPS for people from El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, and Nicaragua has to be seen as a reflection of the Trump administration’s anti-immigrant ideology

“Given the conditions in the affected countries, the State Department recommendation can only be understood in the context of politicization and anti-immigrant animus that has now infected the Trump administration top to bottom,” said Sáenz. “The TPS recipients whose future is at stake are long-term residents who have been living and working here legally for many years, working in stable jobs, paying taxes, supporting families, and otherwise contributing to their communities. They have more than 270,000 US citizen children and thousands of US citizen grandchildren.”

UNITE HERE said that people who fear that their lives could be turned upside down, should not give up hope.

The union said that it is planning a national political campaign to get Congress to protect the TPS status of people.

“The onus falls now on Congress to take action to save TPS to protect Nicaraguan recipients as well as recipients from Honduras, Haiti, and seven other countries,” said the union.

“UNITE HERE has run one of the most high-profile TPS campaigns in the immigration community over the past year,” stated the union. . . “And we will not end that work now. We will continue advocating for TPS extensions for Nicaragua and comprehensive pathways to citizenship for all immigrants in the upcoming budget fight and beyond.”

UNITE HERE mobilizes members for justice at work and beyond

UNITE HERE on October 19 launched a coordinated mobilization of its member in the hospitality and associated industries in more than 40 cities across the US.

UNITE HERE’s national day of action included strikes, acts of non-violent civil disobedience, rallies, and media conferences.

The union, which has 270,000 members many of whom are immigrants, mobilized its members to protest “the attack on immigrants, women, and all workers,” said the union it its media statement about the mobilization.

“We are in a political age where immigrants, women, and all workers are under constant attack, and equality for all is at risk of being no more than just a dream,” said D. Taylor,  UNITE HERE’s president.

The solution, continued Taylor, is build real political power that can defeat the constant attacks against races and religions that have become all too common today and hold the world’s richest corporations accountable.

Taylor praised UNITE HERE’s hospitality workers for leading the fight for better labor standards for all workers and better protections for immigrant workers and said that the national day of action was “only the beginning of what UNITE HERE will do to take back our country.”

Here’s a sample of the union’s actions.

In Philadelphia, UNITE HERE Local 274 members held Marriott International and its subsidiary Starwood Hotels and Resorts accountable for not delivering the jobs they promised in return for millions of dollars in public subsidies.

Marriott and Starwood own a new luxury hotel in the heart of Philadelphia called Aloft. The owners received $33 million in public subsidies to help build the hotel. Included in those subsidies was $2 million from the state of Pennsylvania in exchange for creating 170 new jobs.

When the hotel opened in August, most of those jobs failed to materialize.

Local 274 members converged on Aloft and occupied its lobby to demand that Marriott and Starwood return the subsidy to the state.

“It’s bad enough that we all have to suffer under Trump’s terrible policies and broken promises,” said Corean Holloway, a UNITE HERE member taking part in the action. “Philadelphia shouldn’t also have to suffer hotel developers who take our money and break their promises.”

A dozen members and supporters staged a non-violent sit-in in the hotel’s lobby and were arrested.

In New Orleans, members of UNITE HERE Local 2262 rallied near the city’s convention center to urge other hospitality workers in the city to join the union.

“When hospitality jobs are unionized, they become middle-class jobs,” said Marlene Patrick-Cooper, UNITE HERE organizing director, at the rally. “It’s the best answer for fighting poverty in the United States.”

Recently, 500 workers at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside hotel voted to join UNITE HERE.

They joined because they wanted the higher pay and better benefits that union hotel workers in the New Orleans area receive.

UNITE HERE is urging other non-union hotel workers to do the same and has formed the New Orleans Hospitality Workers Committee to help them unionize.

In Washington DC on the day before the national day of action, UNITE HERE held a media conference to announce the start of a national campaign to preserve the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) of immigrants who have come to the US to escape dangerous conditions in their countries.

TPS gives these immigrants a chance to work while they wait for the US government to rule on their request to live and work in the US.

The Department of Homeland Security is expected to decide in November whether to extend TPS to workers who have come to the US from Central America.

If TPS is not extended, workers like Juan Hernandez Yanez, a UNITE HERE cafeteria worker from El Salvador, could lose their union jobs and health insurance benefits.

“If TPS is ended for Honduras, Nicaragua, or any of the other countries up for renewal in the coming months, our industry will lose tens of thousands of dedicated long-time workers–who will in turn lose their livelihoods and their families,” said Maria Elena Durazo, UNITE HERE’s general vice president. “People like Juan pay taxes, play by the rules, and have built lives here in the US.”

In Hawaii, members of UNITE HERE Local 5 conducted a one-day strike at the Ilikai hotel to demand a new contract that reflects the same pay and labor standards at other unionized hotels in Hawaii.

Local 5 has been negotiating a new contract with the hotel’s owners, but the negotiations have dragged on for two years.

The Ilikai workers walked off the job to demonstrate their determination to win a new contract that substantially raises pay and benefits.

“We will never stop fighting for the dignity of the women and men at the Ilikai,” says Joli Tokusato, an Ilikai front desk clerk. “iStar and Aqua-Aston (the hotel’s owners) need to do the right thing for Hawaii’s working families and settle a fair contract.”

The Ilikai workers were joined by hundreds of other Local 5 members on the picket line during the strike.

According to Local 5, “management reached out to us in the middle of the action to talk about a pathway to settlement. This is a huge victory and a lesson we need to take with us into 2018: when workers are strong and united, it sends the message loud and clear to our employers.”

Boston food service workers win standard setting pay increase

Food service workers at Northeastern University in Boston voted on October 10 to ratify a new collective bargaining agreement that will raise their annual wage to at least $35,000 by 2019.

The new agreement is the second collective bargaining agreement that the workers’ union UNITE HERE Local 26 has negotiated that establishes a minimum annual salary of $35,000 for university food service workers in the Boston area.

The agreements also provide for improved health care and pension benefits and should serve as a new standard for collective bargaining agreements that unions in the area negotiate for service workers.

At Northeastern, members of Local 26 had voted to strike unless their new collective bargaining agreement included a substantial pay increase.

They needed a big pay raise because their pay was so low that some of the workers were receiving public assistance.

They reasoned that their employer Chartwells, which operates university dining halls all over the US and is owned by the international food service conglomerate Compass Group, shouldn’t be paying poverty wages.

Their vote to strike was inspired by the success of Harvard food service workers who won a minimum annual salary of $35,000 a year ago as a result of a 22-day strike.

The Chartwells workers were prepared to begin their strike on October 11, two days before Northeastern was to host the annual meeting of the Clinton Foundation’s Clinton Global Initiative University (CGIU).

According to the Clinton Foundation, CGIU meetings bring together “students, university representatives, top experts, and celebrities . . . to discuss and develop innovative solutions to pressing global challenges” including among other things “the alleviation of poverty.”

Had the strike taken place, Bill and Chelsea Clinton and others attending the meeting to discuss innovative strategies for alleviating poverty would have had to decide whether to cross the workers’ picket line to attend the meeting or to honor the picket line in order to stand in solidarity with workers fighting to alleviate their own poverty.

The union and Chartwells, however, reached an agreement just a few hours before the strike was to begin.

The new agreement includes a total wage increase of $5.56 an hour over five years for all workers. By 2019 all full-time workers will be making at least $35,000 a year.

In addition, the company will pay 97 percent of the workers’ health care costs and will begin contributing to UNITE HERE’s pension fund so that workers can start accruing retirement benefits.

The new contract also includes protections for immigrants, more sick days, better non-discrimination language in the contract that includes protections for gender identity and expression, additional sick days, and language that protects workers from lost wages when the state declares snow day emergencies.

“I am so proud of what we accomplished,” said Angela Bello, a Northeastern food service worker and member of the Local 26 bargaining team. “It’s amazing to feel the power that workers have when we get together and are well organized. The ways this contract will impact our lives is almost hard to believe. Thank you to everyone who supported us and believed in us.”

Brian Lang, president of Local 26, said that the new collective bargaining agreement at Northeastern will serve as the standard in the union’s next round of bargaining for service workers in the Boston area.

“Our union fights so that our members can have their fair share of the wealth they create. Last year that meant we struck Harvard University for 22 days. This week we threatened to do the same at Northeastern. Next on the list are the 34 Boston hotels where contracts expire in 2018.” said Lang.

Unions support Haitian immigrants; demand long-term protected status

Bowing to public pressure, the Trump administration extended the temporary protected status (TPS) of 58,000 Haitian workers living in the US, but only for six months.

The extension means that thousands of Haitians living and working in the US won’t face the threat of immediate deportations.

But they are still living in a precarious state because in six months the administration could change its mind.

Unions supporting the Haitian workers were glad to hear that an extension had been granted but criticized the short-term reprieve and vowed to continue to fight for a long-term solution.

“Forcing refugees from a devastated country to live on edge for six months is unacceptable,” said Jeremy Cruz-Haicken president of UNITE HERE Local 737 in Central Florida, where many Haitian immigrants live.  “These hardworking, tax-paying refugees support Central Florida’s economy, and they deserve long-term certainty. We’ll take these six months to fight for a long-term solution.”

Rocio Saenz, SEIU executive vice president, said that the extension was good but too short.

“Doing so for only six months – instead of the 18 month extensions that have been granted in the past – leaves Haitians with TPS in limbo, unable to plan their lives,” said Saenz.

He added that “the fight for another extension must begin immediately.”

The Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program allows the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to grant temporary protected status to immigrants from countries where conditions are unsafe for them to return–countries such as Haiti.

That protection was extended to Haitians living in the US in 2010 after an earthquake devastated their country and left millions homeless.

TPS allows Haitians to live and work in the US without fear of being deported.

Since coming to the US, many Haitians have found work in the food service, hospitality, health care, and tourist industries and some are members of unions including SEIU and UNITE HERE.

Their protected status was up for review, and DHS had to decide before July 22 whether to extend or deny TPS to Haitians.

Under the Obama administration, DHS had reviewed the protected status of Haitians three times and extended their TPS by 18 months each time.

But word had gotten out that the current DHS Secretary John Kelly was considering denying TPS to Haitians because he believed that conditions in Haiti are improving.

But that is hardly the case. After the earthquake, 1.5 million people were left homeless, and seven years after the earthquake tens of thousands remain homeless.

After the earthquake, the United Nations sent peacekeepers to Haiti to provide security, but the peacekeepers brought cholera, which caused an epidemic throughout the country sickening 800,000 and killing nearly 10,000. The epidemic continues unabated.

In 2016, a category 4 hurricane hit Haiti inflicting damages totaling $1.9 billion to a country that the World Bank calls the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and one of the poorest in the world.

59 percent of Haitians live under the national poverty level, which is an income of $2.42 a day.

Lifting the protected status of Haitians would have meant that thousands of people living and working in the US would be deported to a land where they have neither homes nor jobs nor prospects.

That specter led to public protests and calls for the government to extend the protected status of Haitians.

A week before DHS announced its six month extension, 2000 people demonstrated at the Universal Studios Theme Park in Orlando, Florida where hundreds of Haitian workers are employed to demand that the Trump administration extend long-term protected status to Haitian refugees.

DHS also heard from humanitarian organizations, unions, business, and elected officials urging it to extend the protected status of Haitians.

The Haitian government told DHS that the current conditions in Haiti make it difficult for the country to absorb the return of so many people.

“The legal and policy case for extending TPS for Haitians was overwhelming,” said SEIU’s Saenz. “Haiti cannot safely handle so many returning deportees because it has not yet recovered from the devastating 2010 earthquake, last October’s hurricane, or a continuing deadly cholera epidemic that was first brought to the island by peacekeepers sent by the UN to help with earthquake reconstruction.”

After DHS announced that it was extending TPS to Haitians for another six months, there was some relief but there was also anxiety that in another six months they could find themselves deported to country where their safety is in peril.

The same holds true for other immigrants who have been granted TPS, which caused Saenz to call for a TPS extension for all who came from countries still recovering from natural disasters and wars.

Saenz also said that the US needs a more enlightened immigration policy.

“We call for a new level-headed approach to other decisions affecting immigrants,” said Saenz. “Stop wasting taxpayer resources to deport persons who have lived here for years who pose no danger to public safety. Restore America’s tradition as a place of refuge, and embrace the Constitution’s protection of religious minorities, including Muslims. And overall work to integrate immigrants to our nation instead of demonizing them and building walls.”

Unions: Trumpcare hurts workers; enriches the already rich

The Republican plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), or Obamacare, was filed in Congress on March 6.

The official title of the Republican bill is the American Health Care Act (AHCA), but D. Taylor, president of UNITE HERE, is calling the new bill “Trumpcare.”

When the bill was introduced, labor unions condemned it as a gift to the rich paid for by the working class.

One week after the bill was introduced, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its analysis of Trumpcare. The CBO analysis confirms that the unions are right.

The New York Times reports that according to the CBO analysis, Trumpcare cuts taxes on the wealthy and corporations by $1 trillion over the next ten years.

Those taxes help pay for federal subsidies that made health insurance affordable for many workers.

Trumpcare eliminates the subsidies, putting affordable health care out of reach for millions of workers.

It also reduces Medicaid funding by $880 billion and caps the growth of future funding. The reduction and cap will cause millions of low-income workers to lose Medicaid coverage.

“This isn’t a health care plan, it’s a shameful handout to corporations and the wealthy paid by working families who will pay for the tax cuts with less coverage,” said Chris Shelton, president of the Communications Workers of America (CWA) when the bill was first introduced.

“President Trump and the Republican Party ran on a promise to immediately repeal the ‘broken’ Affordable Care Act and replace it with something ‘great’,” said Taylor. “Instead, what was unveiled by House Republicans is a plan that slashes health care coverage for millions of Americans.”

Taylor made his statement before the CBO released its analysis.

If anything Taylor may have underestimated the number of people who will lose coverage.

The CBO analysis states that the Trumpcare will cause 24 million people to lose health care coverage over the next ten years. Fourteen million will lose coverage within a year of its passage.

One reason that workers will lose health care insurance is that Trumpcare eliminates Obamacare subsidies for purchasing health insurance and replaces it with tax credits.

But the Trumpcare tax credits are less generous than Obamacare subsidies and don’t increase as the price of health insurance increases.

Additionally, Trumpcare would allow insurance companies to charge older workers much more than younger workers, but  tax credits for older workers will be the same as younger workers.

Trumpcare would also phase out the Obamacare expansion of Medicaid, which made Medicaid available to many more low-income workers.

Trumpcare also changes the nature of Medicaid, which would no longer be a government benefit for workers who meet certain income requirements.

Instead, the federal government would provide grants to states. The states would determine eligibility rules and the level of benefits.

If the federal grant does not cover the cost of everyone who is eligible, benefits would be rationed. Some would get them; others wouldn’t.

“Trumpcare will gut Medicaid expansion and subsidies that have made lifesaving health care available to millions of Americans,” said Taylor.

Trumpcare could also cause employers to drop health insurance benefits for their workers.

Forbes reports that up to 7 million workers could lose their employer-based insurance benefit because of Trumpcare.

One of the reasons that workers may lose their employer-based health care benefit is that Trumpcare maintains the Obamacare excise tax, a 40 percent tax on employer-based health insurance whose premium costs exceed the national average of health care premium costs.

The high cost of the excise tax could cause some employers to drop employee health care insurance. Others may cut benefits to avoid the tax.

The excise tax would  especially hurt union workers, who through years of struggle have won good, affordable employer-based health care insurance.

By maintaining the excise tax, Trumpcare “will drive up already skyrocketing out-of-pocket costs and drive down coverage for the vast majority of Americans under age 65—more than 177 million—who get health insurance through work,” said Taylor.

RoseAnn DeMoro, executive director of National Nurses United (NNU), also joined the chorus of union leaders criticizing the anti-working class nature of Trumpcare.

“The principal effect of the new bill will be the loss of existing health coverage for tens of millions of people, without any restraints on health care industry pricing practices that add up to massive health insecurity for the American people.” writes DeMoro writing for Common Dreams.

Health care in the US can’t be fixed, continued DeMoro until “our broken, dysfunctional, profit-focused health care system (is replaced by) an improved Medicare for all system,” which would expand Medicare so that it covers everybody.

DeMoro writes that NNU is building grassroots support for a single-payer health care plan like Medicare in the state of California “that could become the national model (for) an alternative to both the ACA and the fraudulently named GOP American Health Care Act.”

 

Union fights Trumpcare’s proposal to tax employee health benefits

This week, members of UNITE HERE will be visiting local offices of their US senators and representatives to tell them to oppose a Republican-proposed tax on employee health insurance benefits.

UNITE HERE is the union of 270,000 workers employed in the the hotel, gaming, food service, manufacturing, textile, distribution, laundry, transportation, and airport industries.

A draft of a Republican proposal to repeal and replace Affordable Care Act (ACA), or Obamacare, began circulating among members of Congress on February 10.

A key feature of this proposal is a new tax on workers’ health care benefits.

The new tax on workers’ health care benefits would replace a tax on the wealthy, which currently helps fund subsidies that middle- and low-income workers use to purchase health insurance on the federal and state insurance market exchanges.

The GOP plan, also called Trumpcare, could be introduced in Congress by as early as this week.

UNITE HERE called Trumpcare’s tax on employee health care benefits a “double-whammy” on working class health care.

“The GOP is replacing Obamacare with Trumpcare, which will destroy the best aspects of the ACA while imposing one of the largest tax increases on the American middle class ever leveled by a political party,” said Mike Casey, chairperson of UNITE HERE’s Health Care Task Force. “Over 177 million Americans who depend on employer based health care for their health and well-being will soon be hit with a double-whammy by the GOP Trumpcare plan: a huge new tax on their health benefits followed by higher premiums, higher deductibles and less access to quality care. The GOP is walking the plank with Trumpcare and will soon be swimming with the wrath of an American middle class furious with their dramatic tax increase and cut in health care benefits.”

While UNITE HERE members are talking to senators and representatives about the health care benefits tax, media ads funded by the Working Americans for Affordable Health Care PAC will be informing the public about the new Trumpcare tax proposal.

Some media ads will begin running this week in five US House of Representative districts in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Virginia.

Those five districts are currently represented by Ann Wagner (R-MO), Steve Knight (R-CA), Darrell Issa (R-CA), Barbara Comstock (R-VA) and Luke Messer (R-IN).

In addition to raising taxes on workers, Trumpcare will undo much of the good done by Obamacare.

Since Obamacare was implemented, 20 million people who weren’t covered by health insurance are now covered. For many of these people, access to health insurance was made possible by subsidies provided through Obamacare.

Trumpcare eliminates those subsidies.

Since Obamacare was implemented, the percentage of people with health care insurance decreased from 18 percent to 8.6 percent.

One of the reasons for this steep decline is the fact that Obamacare made Medicaid available to more low-income workers.

Trumpcare reduces Medicaid funding and ends its status as an entitlement program, meaning that many low-income workers who qualify for Medicaid under Obamacare will no longer be able to enroll in Medicaid.

Since Obamacare was implemented, workers with pre-existing health conditions have been able to get health insurance. Prior to Obamacare, insurance companies routinely denied health insurance coverage to people with pre-existing health conditions, but Obamacare banned this practice.

Trumpcare eliminates the pre-existing condition ban.

In place of the pre-existing conditions ban, Trumpcare would help states fund high-risk health insurance pools for people with pre-existing health conditions.

But high-risk pools have been tried in the past and failed to adequately insure people with pre-existing conditions. “States that ran high-risk pools prior to the ACA found it virtually impossible to actually finance them sustainably while covering significant numbers of people,” reports Thomas Huelskoetter of Think Progress.

As part of its efforts to inform the public about Trumpcare’s shortcomings, UNITE HERE called out members of Congress who want to repeal Obamacare and replace it with Trumpcare.

“Members of Congress like Ann Wagner, Steve Knight, Darrell Issa, Barbara Comstock and Luke Messer and all the rest get first-class health care thanks to US taxpayers, and they get it for life,” said Casey. “Yet they have the audacity to consider asking those same taxpayers to pay more in taxes in order to settle for second-class health care. We will fight them in Congress and see them at the ballot box.”